Building

Ellsworth Kelly

Blue Black, 2000

Painted aluminum panels

336 x 70 x 2 1/8 inches

Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Photograph by Robert Pettus

Ellsworth Kelly

Blue Black

Composed of two painted aluminum panels, Ellsworth Kelly's Blue Black is a vertical wall sculpture that was commissioned by Emily Rauh Pulitzer and installed on the south wall of the Main Gallery. Kelly's choice of colors is at once striking and subtle—strong enough to engage the eye on a grand scale, but restrained enough to accord with Tadao Ando's poetic allocation of space. As natural light spills in from the narrow skylight above and shimmers off of the reflecting pool to its right, Blue Black maintains a dynamic relation to both the architecture and the environment that frame it. Equally geometric and totemic, Kelly's sculpture instills a familiar form with an endlessly unfixed meaning.

Light Series

Richard Serra

Joe, 1999

Weathering steel

Outer spiral approximately 163 x 576 x 480 inches

Photograph by Robert Pettus

Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Richard Serra

Joe

Commissioned by Emily Rauh Pulitzer as a permanent feature of the courtyard, Richard Serra's Joe articulates a space that reframes perceptions of scale and movement through its subtle, shifting contours. As a counterpoint to Tadao Ando's angular forms and immutable concrete, Joe conveys an evolving sense of the organic; the walls of the sculpture's spiral path expand and contract, conveying you to its center—a vast expanse of sky, framed by a ribbon of weathering steel. Named in homage to the late Joseph Pulitzer Jr., who commissioned the artist's first site-specific sculpture in 1970, Richard Serra's Joe stands as a testament to the forces of life that influence and shape us.

Comparing Richard Serra and Gordon Matta-Clark